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Author Topic: Only one Abbo adopted over the last decade ??? who would have thought?

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http://www.ntnews.com.au/article/2013/05/14/320815_ntnews.html


NT Chief Minister Adam Giles says his government will remove neglected Aboriginal children from their parents and place them in adopted homes if necessary.
Mr Giles, the first-ever indigenous state or territory leader, said governments had failed Aboriginal children because of fears they would be accused of creating a new Stolen Generation, but he would not be put off by such accusations.

"Whatever we do has to be about making parents take responsibility for their kids," Mr Giles said.
"And if they won't, (we're) prepared to provide alternative solutions. If that means those kids are loved and cared for by other parents, then so be it."
Mr Giles said despite the federal intervention, only one Aboriginal child had been adopted in the last decade.
"There are situations in the Northern Territory where nobody has been prepared to support a permanent adoption of a child for fear of Stolen Generation," he said.


 :-\ :-\ :-\ :-\ :-\
Mr Giles said the legal mechanisms for adoption were already available, but governments had been reluctant to act.
The result, he said, was that in towns across the Territory, numerous children wandered in high-risk situations, often fearful to go home to homes awash with alcohol and violence.
"Where there are couples who wish to provide love and support for children who are neglected and not cared for properly, and it can be determined that the parents will not be able to look after their kids properly till they're older, then we need to make that opportunity available," he said.
"You mean to tell me when we've got all these alleged cases of chronic child sexual abuse, children running around on petrol, going on the streets at night sexualising themselves in some circumstances, and there's only one permanent adoption, for fear of Stolen Generation?
"That is not standing up for kids."
Mr Giles said he wanted the public to know he was prepared to act and said his Cabinet was fully behind him.

"If you've got kids who aren't being looked after by their parents, there's only so many times you can try and intervene to get that right," he said.




How about we just make it easier on the government and the kids.. make some money while we are at it. the world needs Bio diesel and also Fertiliser. Go figure!
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http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/national/cebby-from-tennant-creek-just-wants-to-be-cared-for/story-fncz7kyc-1226660604087
WHEN Cebby was a tiny baby, his mother, a young and dedicated drinker from the township of Elliott, in the Northern Territory, handed him over to her mother, so she could resume her drinking. But her mother was also a drinker.                                       
By the age of six weeks, Cebby was living with his grandmother in a filthy house, further south in Tennant Creek. He had double ear infections, gastro, lice and scabies. He was malnourished and weak.
As so often happens in Tennant Creek, the informal carer network went into action. A local white woman cleaned and healed Cebby, taking care of him for six months until a local white man, Dennis Windsor, in an unofficial arrangement, became his full-time carer.Pictures: Hopes and fears for Aboriginal children               
Cebby called Dennis "Pulkka", meaning old man. When Dennis died late last year, Cebby, aged eight, was lost. He'd known a steady life, with a clean bed, clean clothes, and regular meals and schooling. Cebby was now hanging out with his extended family in the riotous town camps, where no one took charge of him.
Petrol-sniffing CCTV reveals tragedy of Outback children               
Cebby let responsible adults know that he was frightened. His people were drinking and fighting. He wasn't used to this life. He didn't belong.
One of Cebby's great aunts took him to live with her in a room in the Eldorado Motel, which has recently begun taking in desperate Aboriginal families in an attempt to deal with the town's chronic housing shortage.
Neglect the most common form child abuse in Northern Territory               
But the aunt, who looks after other kids, has been unable to give Cebby the routine he's come to expect. He's a beautiful kid, who likes to read and disappear into his own world. He wants certainty, and protection.
Cebby knows his mother is indifferent, and says he wouldn't live with her anyway. "She drinks too much," he says. "I like to go to a safer place."
Town camp life has scared him. "They act silly, they hurt kids," he says. "Sometimes people are so drunk they grab knife for a fight." He doesn't care who takes him in, white or black. "As long as it's safe," he says.
His mum, who still lives in Elliott, has since had two more kids. She says she can't look after Cebby, but says she doesn't want the government to intervene.
"I don't want him adopted," she says. "I just want someone to care for him. I want him to go to school in Sydney and when he's finished come back to visit family."
That could be years away, I tell her. "I know," she says.


CEBBY's story, of a search for sanctuary, is common in the Territory. There are hundreds of kids wandering at night, in Alice Springs, Tennant Creek, Elliott and Katherine, who cannot rely on their parents to feed them or give them a safe home.
The parents are drunk. They handball kids to the grandparents, who become the primary carers. But they in turn find it hard to control the kids, who have become accustomed to their autonomy.
They look after themselves as best they can, averting their hunger by sniffing aerosols or petrol, committing break - ins, or hanging out in late - night groups in the security in numbers.
Bess Price, outspoken member of the Country Liberals who last year won the NT seat of Stuart, says Aborigines come from a cultural structure where parental duties are shared.
"Everybody thinks that's our culture," she says. "But our culture has changed. We can't have that excuse any more.
"It's come to situation where no one's in charge. We need to work with each other to tell the parents, you can't just leave your children with the grandparents. I see it with my own nephews and nieces. It's more about themselves, and they don't realise how important parenting is.
"They don't grow up not even knowing what love is, or who their parent is. Everyone is caring them except the parents who gave birth to them. We need that to change."
Price's parliamentary boss is Adam Giles, an indigenous man who seized power by coup and became NT chief minister three months back. Giles recently told News Ltd that Aboriginal children who were seriously neglected should be put up for adoption.
Giles said no one was prepared to intervene on neglected children for fear of being accused of creating another Stolen Generation.
As the law stands, neglected children taken into protection by welfare must first be placed with immediate or extended Aboriginal family, or placed in an unspecified Aboriginal community. Placing them with white carers is the last option.
A groundswell is afoot to change the NT's child - protection laws, by removing the law's racial requirements and making the child's well - being the primary imperative.
We're standing in the Alice Springs Garden Cemetery, where a fortnight earlier, Price buried her sister, who was taken from her mother back in the Stolen Generation times.
 
 
It was not until the 1970s that Price's mum became reacquainted with this daughter, whom nuns had placed with another Aboriginal family in the Santa Teresa community, south - east of Alice.
 
Price has mixed feelings on what happened to her sister, but no recriminations. She does not believe Giles' threat to intervene on neglected children is the same as the Stolen Generations, which was a policy about race, not individual child welfare.
In a nearby grave lies Price's cousin, Regina Elsie Nelson, who was buried in December, after being killed in a town camp. She was 22. Her husband has been charged with her murder.
"Now we have her two little children who are raised by their grandmother," says Price. "This has been going on so long, where young mothers die, but no one blinks an eye. We need to start acknowledging this abuse, because we are all Australians. Something needs to be done about it, now."
 
 

SOME parents try their best. Janet Gordon lives in Yuendumu, north - west of Alice Springs. She is beside herself over what to do about S, the kid she has raised since she was two months old.
S was handed her to Janet by her mother at the age of two months, because she knew she couldn't care for her when she was drinking. When S was five, her mother was stabbed to death by her husband in the Hermannsburg community, west of Alice. The death was almost according to script.
 
 
Janet has since doted on S, not having any children of her own. In an unusual situation for an overcrowded bush community, S - who calls Janet "mum" -- has her own bedroom. Her adoptive Aboriginal parents have insisted in knowing where she is, at all times.
 
 
But with so many other kids without parental restrictions, S felt her loving family home too restrictive.
S is now 15. Janet says about two years ago, S stopped coming home at night. She feared the girl was falling into a bad situation, and about to get "married", in the Aboriginal way, by living with a man.
 
 
Last year Janet, a non - drinker, lost it with S after she didn't come home. Janet gave her a flogging, using a small torch to rap her around the wrists and shoulders.
 
 
As a result of the federal intervention, the kids of Central Australia know their rights: they've had it drummed into them that they cannot be hit or touched by an adult.
S went to school complaining of abuse, and Janet copped a six - month good behaviour bond and a $700 fine. In this case, it seemed Janet cared too much.
 
 
As we spoke to Janet, S was further north, in Lajamanu, reportedly hanging with a group of drinkers. Janet's husband, Harry Collins, was on the road, having driven six hours' north from Yuendumu to plead with S to come home. When she saw him, she ran.
 
 
Janet is beside herself. She maintain's S's room like a shrine. It is spotless; S has a PlayStation, a flatscreen TV, and a laptop in her own room. But she wants to hang out with the wild kids and the hardened drinkers.
"I'm still worrying about her," says Janet, crying. "I try to teach her good way. I want to force S to go to college. She's smart." She shows us S's school achievement certificates, framed on the wall.
"She don't want strict parents to look after her," says Janet. "I don't want her to get married, to live with men. I keep telling her, 'I won't let you get married when you're 15. 16, 17. Not till you're 20, 21.' She says, 'Yeah, yeah.'
"I love her. She don't listen. I really want to send her to college."
As we went to press, there was a good result: Janet and Harry had made the trek north to Lajamanu once again, and persuaded S to come home. Their dedication has paid off, for now.

KEN Langford - Smith is principal of Yipirinya School in Alice, which caters mainly to town camp kids. It is non - government and independent, meaning it constantly battles for funding.
It is the standout national example of frontline indigenous schooling. It deals with broken kids, every day. Its main lure to drag kids to school is its breakfast and lunch program, because kids miss out at home.
"They're some of the most disadvantaged children in Australia," says Langford - Smith.
 
 
"We see poverty, we see parents who are not working and are on handouts, we see overcrowding. And when alcohol and family fights come in, that's when children get neglected and run around and fend for themselves.
"The children don't get enough sleep at night. Each child doesn't have his or her bedroom. It's often the most convenient mattress, in a different place, at night. If no one putting you to bed, you're tired at school."
Yipirinya gets a 60 per cent attendance, at best. It sends buses out to the town camps, and it drops kids home, but it's still not enough.
 
 
"The children get caught up in all of this," says Langford - Smith. "They accept it, and some have a very hard time."
 
 
He says it's easy to tell when kids have vision or hearing problems, but "so many of our town camp children have suffered trauma. That's difficult to assess. You can see the anger in the classroom, you see them erupt, yet nobody's assessing them as special needs. Yet they do need counselling and support."
 
The school is superb for the efforts it makes. Clearly, the children are greatly valued. It hopes to set up emergency housing for the kids that return on the school buses, in the afternoons, because the drivers have no place safe to leave them.
 
 
"We often have young girls come to us saying, 'They're drinking at home, or visitors have arrived, can we go somewhere safe?'" says Langford - Smith.
 
 
"Sometimes we try and place them somewhere safe. Other times, you're sad. The bus drops them and you see everybody drinking. You feel terrible in that context.
 
"You feel, 'Am I doing the wrong thing?' But some want to be with their parents. You can report that situation (to welfare), that's all you can do."
Kids play out the abuse they suffer at school. "Anger and losing temper is most common," says Langford - Smith. "Overt sexual behaviour among kids indicates something is not right and needs to be followed up."
He says up to 20 per cent of Yipirinya kids are notified with the NT's Office of Children and Families.
 
 
Kids head home to scenes of hard - drinking and women sitting around the gambling blanket, playing with welfare money that was supposed to feed the kids. "They're using parenting money, there's no doubt about that," Langford - Smith says.
 

Des Green, officer - in - charge of Tennant Creek police, characterises the children who wander the streets at night as abused.
 
 
"What we do - and it's not something we enjoy doing - we have to get that child to a place of care," he says. "We'll take them home to a responsible adult, but in a lot of instances when we get to the home, the challenge is to find someone who is proper and capable to look after the child."
 
 
Green says with Tennant Creek's drinking problems, they can't pick all the kids up.
 
"The last thing you want is kids in custody," he says. "But what are their care providers doing? Why are they on the streets in the first place? We want parents to take responsibility for their youth."
 
Further north in Elliott, we encounter a scene in the bushes off the main drag: men drinking VB at a table under a tree; women gambling, and drinking, under another tree. Kids are playing in the middle.
The male drinkers, reluctant at first, get talkative. They explain that when the intervention came in, in 2007, blue signs were posted at the entrances to their homes in the town camps, outlawing alcohol and porn.
Unable to drink at home, they drink here. Yet NT law says they cannot drink within two km of a pub, and they are inside the two km zone. So police turn up and tip out their drinks.
They argue they would be better off drinking, legally, at home. "When we drink at home, we know our kids are safe," says a local woman, who argues that Elliott, a tiny town, is not as bad as places like Tennant Creek and Katherine.
Here, they say, everyone knows each other and the place hasn't been overrun with drinkers coming in from the bush, causing trouble.
They point to a double fatality, the day before, where two drinkers were hit by a road train on the Central Arnhem Highway. They argue the couple was killed because they were forced to drink on the fringes of their community, not in their homes, because of intervention laws.
Whether the kids would be safer at home is contestable. But what cannot be disputed is that the federal intervention, which came on the back of The Little Children Are Sacred Report, which told of the "rivers of grog" infesting the north, has failed to turn off the tap.
Adults make the choice to drink. Children have no say.

MARIE Allen, a Wardaman woman who lives west of Katherine, believes authorities must intervene to remove neglected kids. Allen talks from experience: she was a member of the Stolen Generations, taken from her mother at the age of seven from the town of Pine Creek.
Allen cannot say what her life would have been had she not been taken - but she sees no correlation between the current debate and the Stolen Generation.
 
 
"People were taken in the Stolen Generation because of a government policy," she says. "This time they've got to be taken for their own safety, because there's no control over them. If you take children away, you're going to be saving them."
 
 
Allen knows she'll get people off-side. But the warning is stark. Young parents who take the view that they don't need to look after their kids, in the hope some other family member will, risk losing them to the care of strangers.



So... Why the heck do we allow these black clowns to breed? With the baby bonus gone.. perhaps it'll help a little? Who is making these gins take responsibility for their actions?
 
 
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http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/national/northern-territory-children-are-a-lost-generation/story-fncz7kyc-1226660611172
 
THIS two-year-old girl has not been punched. She's just a Northern Territory town-camp kid.                                       
The photo was taken last weekend. The child has what locals call "fly-eye", a condition spread by flies in unhygienic home conditions.
               
The child has since been treated but Dr Len Notaras, who heads the National Critical Care and Trauma Response Centre at Royal Darwin Hospital, says the child's eyes may indicate deeper problems.
"It's almost certain this child will be exposed to other things," he says.
"It's a product of a neglect and a poor approach to hygiene and living conditions where people are living 12 to a house, with camp dogs, all those things, which should be simple to rectify."
               
The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare's most recent Child Protection report states that indigenous children are almost eight times as likely to be the subject of child abuse and neglect as non-indigenous children.
               
The figures are on the rise in the NT, with 7970 child-abuse notifications in 2011-12, of whom 74 per cent were indigenous.
 

This is up 22 per cent rise on 2010-11, reflecting better reporting but also higher abuse. Reports of neglect made up half the notifications, and were mostly among the 0-4 age group.
               
Poor parental knowledge of good hygiene continues to plague indigenous communities, with Australia still battling with treatable conditions such as trachoma, also spread by flies in unsanitary conditions.
"This child represents a lot of other kids in the same situation," said Dr Notaras.
"The eyes are the sentinel, indicating other things are going on. This is a child who is vulnerable and at significant risk of renal disease, blindness, death.
"When I arrived here 20 years ago, I thought there was significant progress and we were a generation away from good health. Now I look at it, there is good progress being made, but looking at these kids we're still a couple of generations away.
"We should have been there, now."
The Price is Reich!

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http://www.ntnews.com.au/article/2013/06/11/321844_ntnews.html
 
CHILD protection laws and policies are being reviewed as the NT Government prepares for an expected 10,000 notifications of Territory kids in need of help this year.
Minister for Children and Families Alison Anderson is undertaking a review of child protection laws and policies.
Child protection policies for Aboriginal kids have come under scrutiny following an NT News investigation of children who are being raised in unsafe, unstable environments without primary carers across the Territory.
There is a groundswell to change child protection laws so they do not discriminate against white carers wanting to provide a permanent home for Aboriginal kids who have nowhere else to go.
As the law stands, Aboriginal children must be placed with a family member, or an unrelated Aboriginal carer, before a white carer can be considered.



Should just save everyone the trouble and set up a bio diesel plant and fertiliser factory in central Australia! As for the race traitors who'd rather round up a "dingo" from the bush than get a dog from a breeder.. they need to be in those bio-diesel and fertiliser factories too!
 
 
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