Racial Loyalty News

R.L. News => Creativity in the MSM (News) => Topic started by: Rev.Cambeul on 06 August 2019 at 07:13

Title: 2019-08-04 Blaming Trump for Everything - Creativity in Australia
Post by: Hidden to Guests on 06 August 2019 at 07:13
I think Clinton was POTUS when the WCOTC began. Shouldn't they be blaming Clinton then? And LBJ in 73 when Ben Klassen founded the COTC ...


Donald Trump, right-wing terrorism and the rise of the ‘white power’ movement

August 4, 2019 By Chauncey Devega, Salon (https://www.rawstory.com/author/chauncey-devega/)

https://www.rawstory.com/2019/08/donald-trump-right-wing-terrorism-and-the-rise-of-the-white-power-movement

(https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-riPlyUyvYDo/XUdKEiAmBzI/AAAAAAAB9Ko/D_wqTKEhrNQqL1ffei7dW8vsw6RoYZhFQCLcBGAs/s1600/trump%2Bmeme.jpg)

Extract: On March 15, in an event that shocked the conscience of the world, an avowed neo-Nazi and white supremacist murdered 50 people (and injured more than 40 others) in attacks on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. His killing spree ended only because he was confronted by an unarmed man named Abdul Aziz, who forced him to flee.

This story first ran at Salon in April, 2019.

This incident is not an isolated one. Contrary to the “lone wolf” narrative about right-wing terrorism, the Christchurch massacre was the work of a global right-wing movement that exchanges information and resources, radicalizing and indoctrinating vulnerable white people in the United States, Europe, and elsewhere. This “white power” movement is extremely dangerous: In addition to the recent events in New Zealand, there have been deadly attacks in the U.S., Britain, Canada, Norway and Sweden, among other places.

The overt white supremacy of the white power movement does not remain isolated to that subculture. This hate metastasizes and infects “mainstream” conservative political discourse, leaders and the general public. There are many such examples.

The extreme hostility to nonwhite immigrants espoused by the broader white power movement has been massaged and repackaged into the policy positions of Donald Trump and the Republican Party.

On a near daily basis Fox News host Tucker Carlson summons talking points and narratives from white supremacist and other right-wing hate sites and spoon-feeds that poison to his eager audience. Derrick Black, a former white supremacist and the son of a Ku Klux Klan leader, told CNN last Saturday: “It’s really, really alarming that my family watches Tucker Carlson’s show once and then watches it on the replay because they feel that he is making the white nationalist talking points better than they have, and they’re trying to get some tips on how to advance it.”

Should we see white supremacy as a cultural, social and political problem rather than just the pathology of the relatively small white power movement? What does the white power movement want, in practical terms, and what are its activists and foot soldiers willing to do to achieve their goals? Can we explain the New Zealand terror attacks as part of a decades-long plan by the white power movement in America and around the world? How did white hate groups pioneer the use of the early internet and social media to radicalize, recruit and coordinate the actions of their members?

In an effort to answer these questions I recently spoke with Kathleen Belew, an assistant professor of U.S. history at the University of Chicago. Her new book is “Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America.”

This conversation has been edited for clarity and length. You can hear our full conversation on my podcast, “The Chauncey DeVega Show” or through the embedded player below.

Donald Trump and his administration wallow in cruelty. In many ways it is their core unifying principle. That cruelty gives permission for and encourages violence. This has been seen from the lethal white right-wing violence in Charlottesville to the neo-Nazi terror attacks in New Zealand several weeks ago. How does the public become used to such cruelty and violence? Is right-wing violence being normalized in our society?

Those are two interconnected questions. One of them is about the way that political rhetoric and policies that enact racism and violence within our culture normalize those ideas within the mainstream.

A great deal of what is happening at present feels new, with Donald Trump. But this is also familiar, in that we have been struggling with this problem since the 1980s when the white power movement became radicalized and paramilitary.

The white power movement has done a very good job at disguising how it is really a social movement. Part of this subterfuge is done through the “lone gunman” narrative, where the crimes are then viewed as isolated events. Even after the horrible attacks in Charlottesville, there is still a tendency among journalists to divide these events up from one another. The result is that the Tree of Life synagogue mass shooting in Pittsburgh is reported as somehow being different than the Coast Guard officer’s assassination list and all the weapons he was hoarding to carry out his attacks, and those in turn are different from the New Zealand mosque attacks.

Acts of anti-Semitic political violence and anti-Muslim political violence are treated as being somehow discrete when in fact they are united by the same perpetrators, the same ideology and the same belief system.

There is a common understanding in America by many white Americans and some others that whiteness is inherently benign, which means that white racist violence is viewed as something other than systemic. But in many ways whiteness as a political and cultural force was created and enforced through acts of violence against nonwhites.

Blah blah blah. What a load of bullshit ....

The New Zealand mosque attack is an example of a global crisis. What do we know about the international aspect of the white power movement?

In studying transnational movements, you want to think in terms of “both and.” So on the one hand, we can trace inflows to the United States from other places. In the earlier period, the most visible examples might be the way that British Israelism came into the United States through Canada in the 1920s and 1930s. This became the “Christian Identity” movement. Skinhead culture came to the United States from Great Britain.

Groups in the United States are also sending material overseas. The Aryan Nation did mailings to different countries. “The Turner Diaries” shows up in bookstores as far away as South Africa. World Church of the Creator has a presence in Australia. If you’re a white power activist in Australia you can access things on the internet, but you can also read reprinted American white power material like newspapers. You can send away for mail order sermons.

This movement sees violence as a step in an eventual global race war. It wants to start in the communities and countries that it thinks it can salvage from racial others. So this movement has, through this entire period, been focused on the United States, Canada, South Africa, New Zealand, Southern Africa and Europe as places that are still “white enough” to be saved through the kind of warfare that they are planning.

An additional way that the global or transnational color line is important is that the horrible shootings in Christchurch are a spectacular moment of violence — but are not in themselves the end goal of that action. The neo-Nazi terrorist who allegedly committed that mass shooting is not done. What he wants is for that moment of action to “awaken” other white people, to create political rifts that spur government action, which will then “inspire” other white people. This is all part of a long game that is meant to “awaken” white people into seizing “white homelands,” seizing different “white nations” and then eventually annihilating people of color around the world.



If you want to read the rest of this mendacious garbage that passes for Mainstream Media today, you'll have to do so at the source.
https://www.rawstory.com/2019/08/donald-trump-right-wing-terrorism-and-the-rise-of-the-white-power-movement

Of course, feel free to use quote and mock the meanderings of the MSM originating article.