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Author Topic: Muds at the U.S. Border

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Re: Muds at the U.S. Border
« Reply #160 on: 19 November 2019 at 13:44 »
As if we don't have enough problems from our niggers infestation, now we have to deal with an influx of more niggers straight out of Africa.

https://www.ncronline.org/news/people/us-mexico-border-sees-surge-african-migrants-who-face-limited-options

US-Mexico border sees surge in African migrants, who face limited options

Nov 18, 2019
by Sarah Salvadore

While most migrants apprehended at the U.S. border are from Central American countries, a growing number of Africans are making their way to the United States, via the same routes traditionally used by Central Americans and Mexicans. Fleeing ethnic cleansing and political volatility in their respective countries, the migrants are escaping Central African nations like Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Angola.

Visit EarthBeat, NCR's new reporting project that explores the ways Catholics and other faith groups are taking action on the climate crisis.

The surge in numbers of this new population surprised border patrol agents who are more accustomed to Spanish-speaking migrants. In June, border patrol apprehended a record number of African refugees and immigrants from 19 countries. According to the Department of Homeland Security, a majority of apprehensions happened along the Del Rio sector in Texas, consisting mostly of family units and single adults.

"The introduction of this new population places additional burdens on processing stations, to include language and cultural differences," Del Rio Sector Chief Patrol Agent Raul Ortiz, said in a statement. "Our agents continue to meet each new challenge as the ongoing humanitarian crisis evolves."

The presence of the extracontinental population — people from a non-Western Hemispheric region transiting through Latin America — at the border is not new, say experts. Historically, there has been a trickle of migrants from other hemispheres traveling through Mexico to reach the U.S. southern border.

"But we have seen that number more than triple, when you compare last year to this year," said Jessica Bolter, associate policy analyst at Migration Policy Institute, a Washington-based non-partisan think tank that conducts research and analysis on the movement of people across the globe.

Based on figures released by Mexican authorities, 2,700 Africans were apprehended in the last fiscal year. The migrants were apprehended near the U.S.-Mexico border and at various checkpoints across the country. The first eight months of this fiscal year (October 2018 to May 2019), Mexican authorities have already apprehended 3,500 individuals.

"The total will at least double," said Bolter.

There are various reasons linked to the increase of African migrants seeking asylum in the United States. According to the UNHCR, the United Nations refugee agency, political upheaval in the Democratic Republic of Congo earlier this year displaced approximately 4.5 million people.

In Cameroon, conflict has been simmering for decades between the French-speaking majority and the Anglophone south. It has finally boiled over, resulting in the deaths of thousands and reports of torture and rape, prompting many to flee. Among those seeking asylum from Africa are LGBTQI people fearing persecution and student activists/organizers fleeing government retribution from countries like Congo and Cameroon. Homosexuality is illegal in 32 African countries.   

"Another factor for the uptick in African migration through the region is the increased enforcement along European borders," said Maureen Meyer, director for Mexico and migrant rights at Washington Office on Latin America, an advocacy group promoting human rights, democracy and social and economic justice across the Americas.

Europe struck a deal with countries like Turkey to stem the flow of transit migration to the European Union. Faced with enforcement hurdles and the rising cost of the journey, African migrants are opting for the United States.

Another motivational factor for migrants is family members or acquaintances who made the journey to the U.S. successfully, and then sent word back home.

"The majority of the people arrested from the continent of Africa claimed some form of immigration relief due to credible fear of returning to their country. Families chose to make the journey to the United States in order to take advantage of the legal framework that enabled them to be released if traveling as a family group and claiming fear," a spokesperson of the Customs and Border Patrol told NCR.

The journey to the United States takes months. African migrants enter the Western hemisphere through visas into countries like Ecuador and Brazil, which have lax visa requirements. From there, the migrants travel to Colombia to make the trek through Central America to the U.S. border. The journey through Latin America is strenuous, dangerous and expensive. The most treacherous part is the Darien Gap — the world's most remote jungle region accessible only by foot or canoe. The jungle is populated with snakes, poisonous insects and wild animals. Many migrants die of exhaustion or drown in the river.

Most migrants' journeys are facilitated by smugglers. Africans pay thousands of dollars in smuggling and bribery fees before finally reaching the U.S. border.

Earlier this year, the Mexican government issued exit visas to extracontinental migrants to continue their journey to the United States. Since July, the government has cracked down heavily on the flow of migrants passing through Mexico, after the Trump administration struck a deal with Mexican president Andrés Manuel López Obrador.

On Oct. 12, the Mexican military police stopped a migrant "caravan" — that included African migrants — which was moving toward the U.S. border.

"Mexico did not want to repeat the image of a caravan of migrants being allowed to travel through its country to the U.S. border. So, they quickly cracked down on that, and I suspect they'll continue doing that," said Bolter.

"Where we see the impact on them [African migrants] is more the overall pressure of the Trump administration on Mexico, to reduce as much as possible, the flow of migrants reaching the United States. And so, this measure is one of several that Mexico is adapting to make it harder for anyone to travel north," said Meyer.

Because of these recent events, the initial surge of migrants from continental Africa has declined, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

The Mexican bishops' conference expressed its concern regarding the administration's deal with Mexico.

"Our brother migrants must never be a bargaining chip. No negotiations should be placed above what the church and civil society have defended for years: not criminalizing migrants nor the defenders of human rights," it said in a statement.

African migrants are left with limited options. They could apply for humanitarian visas, which would allow them to stay in Mexico, or apply for asylum.

"But we have to remember that there's a lot of people that have no language, cultural or any tie to Mexico, and where, I think they would not believe that Mexico is the right country for them — whether that's for safety concerns, or just in terms of their own ability to effectively settle," said Meyer.

Currently camped in the southern state of Chiapas in Mexico, many African migrants are in dire need of humanitarian aid. Many are in overcrowded detention centers.

"Children, women with babies and pregnant women are in detention. But it's worse in Mexico because it's hard for human rights defenders to reach the detained population," said Claudia León from Jesuits Refugee Service in Mexico. 

"We do have the opportunity to do [go to detention centers]. But the centers are at very high capacity. And there are a lot of people with so many needs. Even asylum claimers are in detention, which shouldn't be like that, but that's the policy," she said.

Mexico's immigration law requires asylum-seekers to stay in the state where they requested asylum or a humanitarian visa. As a result, many people can't leave Chiapas.

"So, in the end, what it does is put extreme strain on Chiapas, and in Chiapan border cities, which is a poor state in Mexico, and arguably has less ability to effectively support this population," said Meyer.

Those not in detention centers find themselves homeless and extremely vulnerable to violence. They also face a language barrier, as most speak French, English, Portuguese and almost no Spanish.

"Many of them are homeless, living in the streets or outside. The Mexican government is doing nothing to help them. It's an absolute nightmare," said León.

"What we've actually seen is growing backlash from local residents who are uncomfortable having thousands of people in their communities. They feel like their local plaza has been taken over by immigrants who have no other place to stay except there, so [there's] the increasing sense of xenophobia in certain towns that have this high population staying there," said Meyer.

In August, around 3,000 African migrants formed the Assembly of African Migrants in Tapachula, with help from Center of Human Rights Fray Matias de Cordovabased in Chiapas. They demandedexpediated transit visas, humanitarian assistance and protection from Mexican security forces.

"I think that the unfortunate part of this is there's a lot of people that might likely qualify for asylum in the United States and may never be given that chance," said Meyer.

The situation, say experts, is only set to worsen in the coming months, with immigration becoming a pivotal issue for President Donald Trump's 2020 reelection campaign.

"The administration has put into place a lot of layers of different policies that are essentially trying to block access to the U.S. for people coming to the southern border," said Bolter.

The administration will be eager to implement agreements it signed with Central American countries to send people back.

"That could certainly affect African migrants. They could be one of the populations subject to these agreements. We don't know how they (agreements) would be implemented. They would probably start off with a small number of people just due to the capacity issues," she said.

Experts say that there could be an increase in smuggling activity, owing to the enforcement of borders.

"What we may likely see is increased smuggling networks, that up until now were basically ensuring people [Africans] could get to southern Mexico. Now they're taking people all the way up to the U.S.-Mexico border. It's not clear how smuggling networks will adapt to this," said Meyer.

"But the general message is that the U.S. is closed — this is certainly something the administration is going to want to pursue," said Bolter.
"As a Reverend Creator and the Liaison to Illinois, I'm willing to guide any person to our wonderful religion of Creativity. I can be reached through email, chats through our Skype and C.A. Site, and snail mail. I urge you to take the first step towards Racial Loyalty and our survival. RaHoWa!"

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Re: Muds at the U.S. Border
« Reply #161 on: 22 November 2019 at 13:10 »
The running joke of U.S. border security.

https://fox5sandiego.com/2019/11/21/16-arrested-after-cutting-through-border-wall-to-enter-us/

16 arrested after cutting through border wall to enter US

POSTED 12:20 PM, NOVEMBER 21, 2019,
BY MEGHAN ROOS, UPDATED AT 03:45PM, NOVEMBER 21, 2019

SAN DIEGO -- Sixteen people were arrested near Campo Wednesday afternoon after cutting through a portion of the border wall and illegally entering the United States from Mexico, according to the U.S. Border Patrol.

Border Patrol agents spotted a white Dodge 4500 utility truck crossing into the U.S. around 3:45 p.m. About 15 minutes later, agents saw a man trying to cut a lock on the private gate of a nearby home with bolt cutters. He was standing near a vehicle that matched the description of the one that had just crossed the border.

The man got back in the truck and drove away when authorities tried to intercept him. Agents began a short pursuit that ended with the driver and 15 people inside the vehicle getting out and running away.

Border Patrol agents quickly arrested all 16 people, who admitted to entering the U.S. illegally. The 16 individuals were taken to a Border Patrol station for processing.

"A vehicle drive-thru, with overloaded and unsecured passengers, particularly in this terrain, can certainly result in a rollover accident with serious injuries and death," San Diego Sector Interim Chief Douglas Harrison said. "The breach of this old landing mat wall is illustrative of the need for more hardened infrastructure with greater impedance and denial capabilities to keep the area secure."

The arrestees included nine male Mexican nationals between the ages of 15 and 53, five female Mexican nationals between the ages of 18 and 40, a 28-year-old Guatemalan man and a 29-year-old Guatemalan woman.
"As a Reverend Creator and the Liaison to Illinois, I'm willing to guide any person to our wonderful religion of Creativity. I can be reached through email, chats through our Skype and C.A. Site, and snail mail. I urge you to take the first step towards Racial Loyalty and our survival. RaHoWa!"

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Re: Muds at the U.S. Border
« Reply #162 on: 29 November 2019 at 10:05 »
https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/26/politics/unaccompanied-children-remain-in-mexico-migrants/index.html

Migrant families have sent roughly 135 children across the US-Mexico border alone, US government says

By Priscilla Alvarez, CNN

Washington (CNN)Migrant families have sent approximately 135 children across the US-Mexico border alone after waiting in squalid and unsafe conditions in Mexico as a result of a Trump administration policy.

The US Department of Health and Human Services told CNN it has identified approximately 135 children in their custody who previously arrived at the southern border with their family and had been returned to Mexico.

In recent weeks, some case managers who work with unaccompanied children began hearing stories from kids who were in Mexico with family members and have since crossed alone, according to a source close to the situation.

A four-year old girl recalled her grandmother sitting her down and explaining she had to cross the border alone, according to a source familiar with these cases.

Case managers, who are employed by shelters that work with the Health and Human Services Department, were eventually able to connect with the grandmother in Mexico who explained she worried for her and her granddaughter's safety.

In another instance, an 8-year-old boy crossed the border alone this month after roughly two months in Mexico with his father.

"Parents are sending their kids in order for them to find refuge. We're forcing them to separate in order for them to care for their children," the source said, referring to the policy.

The number of children being sent across the border alone suggests the administration's policy of requiring some migrants to remain in Mexico while their immigration cases play out in the US -- a process that could take weeks or months -- could be having unanticipated and dangerous consequences.

Trump administration begins deporting asylum seekers to Guatemala

Roughly 60,000 migrants are currently in Mexico as a result of the policy, formally known as the Migrant Protection Protocols. Administration officials have credited the policy for helping curb the flow of migrants to the border. Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf recently called it a "game changer."

Immigrant advocates and lawyers say the program puts migrants, many of whom are from Central America, in harm's way and made it more difficult for migrants to obtain counsel for their proceedings. The policy has also been challenged in federal court, but allowed to proceed for the time being.

"Families are being forced to make the decision of being the ones to separate from their child for the safety -- potentially the livelihood -- of their child. How do you explain that to a five year old?" said Nate Bult, vice president of public and government affairs at Bethany Christian Services, which works with unaccompanied children.

Unaccompanied children are exempt from the so-called "Remain in Mexico" policy, which means children that cross the border are taken into custody by the Department of Homeland Security and referred to US Health and Human Services. While in care, case managers work to place a child with a sponsor in the United States, like a parent or relative.

Congressional staffers asked the Office of Refugee Resettlement, an agency within Health and Human Services that cares for unaccompanied children, to identify how many children were in its care who had previously been enrolled in the "Remain in Mexico" program.

The office's records "indicate that from October 2019 to approximately November 19, 2019, 135 children who fall into this category were referred by DHS," HHS told CNN, adding that the figure is being reconciled with the Department of Homeland Security, which is charged with implementing the policy.

HHS said it began tracking referrals of children whose parents may fall under the policy in October to ensure children were able to communicate with their parents.

In a statement provided to CNN, a Department of Homeland Security spokesperson said, "It would be extremely troubling to find that parents are sending their children on a dangerous journey to illegally enter the US alone or in the hands of smugglers, rather than remain in expeditious proceedings that can yield results in a matter of months."

Head of union for asylum officers calls Trump asylum policies 'egregious'

The spokesperson added, "Until Congress acts with targeted legislative fixes that allow DHS to safely return (unaccompanied minors) to noncontiguous countries or hear their asylum claims before making the journey, parents will continue to use their children to exploit legal vulnerabilities in our immigration system."

The administration continues to expand its policy of sending migrants back to Mexico while they wait for their court date in the US.

The most recent expansion plans include busing migrants from Tucson, Arizona, to El Paso, Texas, according to two officials. The Department of Homeland Security says El Paso has the infrastructure to handle the migrants, but in practice, it means migrants would be taken more than 300 miles from where they initially crossed the border, and eventually returned to Mexico from El Paso.

Many shelters along the border have been overwhelmed by the number of migrants waiting for their turn in court and in some areas, makeshift tent camps have cropped up in Mexico.
"As a Reverend Creator and the Liaison to Illinois, I'm willing to guide any person to our wonderful religion of Creativity. I can be reached through email, chats through our Skype and C.A. Site, and snail mail. I urge you to take the first step towards Racial Loyalty and our survival. RaHoWa!"

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Re: Muds at the U.S. Border
« Reply #163 on: 01 December 2019 at 12:25 »
Build the Wall !!!

With a  corrupt sh!thole country like Mexico at our borders, the White Brothers and Sisters in the U.S. will never truly be as safe as they could be. A full border "real" wall (and not the b.s. spotty border barriers) might not solve 100% of the problems but it definitely would help to diminish many of our border issues.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/at-least-14-killed-in-bloody-gunfight-in-northern-mexico/ar-BBXzMcU

At least 14 killed in bloody gunfight in northern Mexico


Ten suspected cartel gunmen and four police were killed during a shootout on Saturday in a Mexican town near the U.S. border, days after U.S. President Donald Trump raised bilateral tensions by saying he would designate the gangs as terrorists.

The government of the northern state of Coahuila said state police clashed at midday with a group of heavily armed gunmen riding in pickup trucks in the small town of Villa Union, about 40 miles (65 km) southwest of the border city of Piedras Negras.

Standing outside the Villa Union mayor's bullet-ridden offices, Coahuila Governor Miguel Angel Riquelme told reporters the state had acted "decisively" to tackle the cartel henchmen. Four police were killed and six were injured, he said.

The fighting went on for more than an hour, during which ten gunmen were killed, three of them by security forces in pursuit of the gang members, Riquelme said.

At about noon, heavy gunfire began ringing out in Villa Union, and a convoy of armed pickup trucks could be seen moving around the town, according to video clips posted by social media users. Others showed plumes of smoke rising from the town.

An unspecified number of people were also missing, including some who were at the mayor's office, the governor said.

Riquelme said authorities had identified 14 vehicles involved in the attack and seized more than a dozen guns. The governor said he believed the gunmen were members of the Cartel of the Northeast, which is from Tamaulipas state to the east.

The outbreak of violence occurred during a testing week for President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who on Friday said he would not accept any foreign intervention in Mexico to deal with violent criminal gangs after Trump's comments.

Lopez Obrador said Mexico would handle the problem, a view echoed by Riquelme as he spoke to reporters.

"I don't think that Mexico needs intervention. I think Mexico needs collaboration and cooperation," said Riquelme, whose party is in opposition to Lopez Obrador. "We're convinced that the state has the power to overcome the criminals."

In an interview aired on Tuesday, Trump said he planned to designate the cartels as terrorist organizations, sparking concerns the move could serve as a prelude to the United States trying to intervene unilaterally in Mexico.

U.S. Attorney General William Barr is due to visit Mexico next week to discuss cooperation over security.

Lopez Obrador took office a year ago pledging to pacify the country after more than a decade of gang-fueled violence.

A series of recent security lapses has raised questions about the left-leaning administration's strategy.

Criticism has focused on the Nov. 4 massacre of nine women and children of U.S.-Mexican origin from Mormon communities in northern Mexico, and the armed forces' release of a captured son of drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman under pressure from cartel gunmen in the city of Culiacan.

Coahuila has a history of gang violence, although the homicide total in the state that borders Texas is well below where it was seven years ago. National homicide figures are pushing record levels. (Reporting by Dave Graham in Mexico City; Editing by Matthew Lewis and Tom Hogue)
"As a Reverend Creator and the Liaison to Illinois, I'm willing to guide any person to our wonderful religion of Creativity. I can be reached through email, chats through our Skype and C.A. Site, and snail mail. I urge you to take the first step towards Racial Loyalty and our survival. RaHoWa!"

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Re: Muds at the U.S. Border
« Reply #164 on: Yesterday at 12:56 »
It's bad enough our Southern border is so porous that these muds just flow into our country. Now we have the beaners being shipped in. What's next parachuting from planes?

https://fox5sandiego.com/2019/12/03/border-patrol-arrests-21-people-on-suspected-smuggling-boat/

Border Patrol arrests 21 people on suspected smuggling boat

POSTED 8:11 AM, DECEMBER 3, 2019, BY MATT MEYER, UPDATED AT 08:17AM, DECEMBER 3, 2019

Agents arrested 21 people found on a suspected smuggling boat off the coast of San Diego. (Photo: DHS)

SAN DIEGO — Border Patrol agents arrested 21 people after stopping a suspected smuggling boat off the coast of San Diego.

The first vessel was spotted entering the U.S. by a Department of Homeland Security aircraft around 11 a.m. Sunday, USBP said. About an hour later, agents caught up to the boat off the coast of Point Loma.


Twenty-one people, ranging in age from 19 to 59, were found on the boat and taken into custody. Border Patrol said four of the people were identified as suspected smugglers, including two U.S. citizens.

The remaining people were Mexican nationals who admitted being in the U.S. illegally, according to officials.

Just after midnight Monday morning, Border Patrol said officials also arrested another 13 people from a panga spotted off the coast of San Clemente.

“With inclement weather conditions and approaching storms, smuggling in the maritime domain will increase the dangers at sea and on the shoreline,” San Diego Sector Chief Patrol Agent Douglas Harrison said. “As I have said before, it is not worth putting your life into the hands of exploitive and indifferent smugglers.”

The people who were arrested are now in DHS custody.
"As a Reverend Creator and the Liaison to Illinois, I'm willing to guide any person to our wonderful religion of Creativity. I can be reached through email, chats through our Skype and C.A. Site, and snail mail. I urge you to take the first step towards Racial Loyalty and our survival. RaHoWa!"

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