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Author Topic: Muds at the U.S. Border

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Re: Muds at the U.S. Border
« Reply #170 on: 17 December 2019 at 13:38 »
https://kvoa.com/news/2019/12/16/shots-fired-at-u-s-border-patrol-agents-near-casa-grande/

Shots fired at U.S. Border Patrol agents near Casa Grande

December 16, 2019
Carla Litto

TUCSON - U.S. Customs and Border Protection announced that passengers of a vehicle fired their weapons at border officials after the vehicle fled an immigration checkpoint 20 miles south of Casa Grande, Ariz. on Monday.

The U.S. Border Patrol agents were working the immigration checkpoint at mile marker 26 on Federal Route 15 when the incident occurred at approximately 2:40 p.m.

Shots were fired at agents from a silver 2014 Ford Taurus before it was stopped with assistance from other law enforcement partners on I-10 near Casa Grande, Ariz.

The driver and two individuals found inside the vehicle's trunk were arrested.

Law enforcement involved did not discharge their firearms and no injuries were reported.

This incident is still under investigation.
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Re: Muds at the U.S. Border
« Reply #171 on: 20 December 2019 at 19:02 »
https://www.foxnews.com/us/arizona-drug-tunnel-third-nogales-cartel-drug

Third tunnel found under US-Mexico border in Arizona town

 By Danielle Wallace | Fox News

Two Mexican nationals were arrested in Arizona this week after a third tunnel – providing a hidden passageway underneath the U.S.-Mexico border – was found in the town of Nogales this month, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said in a statement Thursday.


200 pounds of meth, 2 pounds of white heroin, 3 pounds of cocaine and 7 pounds of fentanyl

ICE agents found the 82-foot long, 8-foot deep tunnel Tuesday while carrying out a search warrant on a home in Nogales, Ariz., the statement said. About 200 pounds of meth, two pounds of white heroin, three pounds of cocaine and six-and-a-half pounds of fentanyl were also found during the raid. The two Mexican nationals -- Jovany Robledo-Delgado and Jesus Martinez Selgado – were arrested and charged with possession and conspiracy to distribute hard narcotics. They both appeared in U.S. federal court Wednesday.

The tunnel runs from the Arizona home to the entry of a sewage pipeline called the International Outfall Interceptor (IOI). The IOI transports millions of gallons of sewage water a day from the sister cities of Nogales – one in Mexico, Sonora, the other across the international boundary in Arizona – to a treatment plant in Rio Rico, Ariz., Fox 10 Phoenix reported.

Officials also found a stash that included 200 pounds of meth, two pounds of heroin, three pounds of cocaine and 6.5 pounds of fentanyl. (U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement)

Tunnels can be used by Mexican cartel members to transport narcotics across the border. Migrants also have reportedly used tunnels to try to enter the U.S. illegally, surpassing designated ports of entry.

Officials believe the tunnel had been there for at least a few months. They carried out the search warrant on the home after receiving an anonymous tip about drug smuggling through the IOI, Phoenix’s KTVK-TV reported. It was the third discovered in Nogales  during December.

On Dec. 4, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents and Mexican police found an incomplete tunnel under the streets during a routine sweep of a stormwater drainage system that serves the sister cities of Nogales on both sides of the border, Fox 10reported.

It ran about 10-feet underground for about 20 feet into the U.S. from the Mexican side of the border. It was about three-feet wide and four-feet tall. Agents found its entrance in the floor of an existing drainage system tunnel – the opening blocked off by dirt and a mixture of Styrofoam and concrete. No people or drugs were found inside.

Some 50 yards away – a second was found on Dec. 10. CBP agents apprehended four migrants after spotting them on surveillance camera attempting to cross the U.S.-Mexico border, according to Fox 10. While retracing the migrant’s journey, agents located the tunnel about 5 feet north of the International Boundary Fence. Mexican police later located the entrance to the tunnel on the other side of the fence. It stretched about 10-feet below ground.
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Re: Muds at the U.S. Border
« Reply #172 on: 21 December 2019 at 13:06 »
Here's a couple more stories that are becoming more common in our news cycle but in my opinion not common enough. Truthfully I would like to know the real numbers of niggers and muds that jump our borders undetected. To me that is the real story. This mud problem would be diminished drastically with a well built wall and man power. But the real fix is to eliminate the free incentives the J.O.G. government dishes out to these freeloading vermin.

https://kfoxtv.com/news/local/border-patrol12-camouflaged-undocumented-immigrants-apprehended

Border Patrol:12 camouflaged undocumented immigrants apprehended

by Erika Esquivel
Thursday, December 19th 2019

SANDERSON, Texas (KFOX14/CBS4) — Twelve undocumented immigrants who were camouflaged were apprehended in west Texas, according to U.S. Border Patrol agents.


Agents assigned to the Sanderson Station in the Big Bend sector apprehended the undocumented immigrants Dec. 18 in a remote area of Brewster County.

The agents tracked foot-sign of the group while being assisted from the air by the CBP Alpine Air Unit in a UH-1N helicopter.

Investigators determined the group was comprised of people from from Guatemala and Mexico.

“This case is another example of illegal border crossers wearing camouflage while making entry in desolate locations in an attempt to evade arrest,” Big Bend Sector Chief Patrol Agent Matthew Hudak said.

https://www.voanews.com/usa/immigration/bold-smuggling-attempt-us-mexico-border

Bold Smuggling Attempt at US-Mexico Border

By Victoria Macchi
December 18, 2019 12:56 PM.

WASHINGTON - The attempt to smuggle more than 70 people from Mexico into Texas this week was bold: A driver pulled a tractor-trailer into the commercial vehicle inspection lanes at a U.S. Border Patrol checkpoint in Laredo, and waited for agents to check the truck.


From a photo released by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, there was little else in the trailer except for dozens of people huddled against a metal-clad wall, heads turned to avoid the camera or the bright light shined at them. 
Most of those visible in the picture were wearing white shirts, which CBP says were marked by the smugglers “to assist the trafficking organization in classifying/identifying the individuals within the group.”

It is unclear what the markings were, and what they signified. A request to CBP for more information was not immediately returned on Wednesday. The story will be updated with the agency’s response.

The group was comprised of men and women from El Salvador, Guatemala and Mexico who entered the United States without authorization, according to CBP. 

The driver, a U.S. citizen, was arrested, as were the people found in the trailer.

While many migrants attempt to cross the border into the U.S. on foot to remain undetected, that often requires swimming across the river or traversing remote, rugged desert areas where deaths by drowning and dehydration regularly occur.

2019 Among Deadliest Years for Migrants Trekking to US

By the end of August, more than 520 migrants in the Americas died or went missing and are presumed to have perished

 The International Organization for Migration, which tracks migrant deaths around the world, reports that as of Dec. 16, 351 people have died along the U.S.-Mexico border this year.

Some people attempt to cross hidden in car trunks or truck beds. Others pay to be transported in large tractor-trailers, where they are sometimes concealed by cargo.

US Border Agents Find Dozens of Migrants Inside Produce Truck

Two Americans are facing human smuggling charges after 32 Mexican and Ecuadorian nationals were found hidden inside a chilled semitrailer

Although vehicles can provide protection from poor weather conditions, they leave large groups of migrants vulnerable to the network of people involved in smuggling, including their drivers. 

In 2018, a truck driver was sentenced to life in prison after a botched smuggling attempt killed 10 people in San Antonio, Texas.

CBP announced last week that apprehensions at the southwest U.S. border decreased for a sixth month, after spiking from late 2018 to May of this year.
I urge every White Man, Woman, and Child to do your part and save our beautiful White Race. Stand up and fight in the Racial Holy War, become a Creator today.

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Re: Muds at the U.S. Border
« Reply #173 on: 25 December 2019 at 22:36 »
The Price is Reich!

Find me on Stormfront as QueJumpingAfghan where I have been banned!


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Re: Muds at the U.S. Border
« Reply #174 on: 26 December 2019 at 18:56 »
So what i got out of this article was that the Central American mud races asylum seekers (waiting in Mexico) wanting into our country are so unruly, that the Mexican muds now need to come here for asylum. On one hand this points out how these Central American mud races aren't the cream of the crop or just needing protection, like our enemies constantly claim. Unfortunately with the increase of Mexican muds our detention centers will be bursting at the seems (more so than usual), since Mexican muds can't be returned to Mexico without a trial first. So this will cause many of them to be released into the interior of our country, due to the over population of holding facilities, over congestion of our already slow court system,  and the laws only allowing asylum seekers about 3 weeks maximum of incarceration while waiting for court.

https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2019-12-26/seeing-a-central-american-surge-mexicans-join-the-asylum-line-at-the-u-s-border

Seeing a Central American surge, Mexicans join the asylum line at the U.S. border

By PATRICK J. MCDONNELLMEXICO CITY BUREAU CHIEF
DEC. 26, 2019

MATAMOROS, Mexico — 

Emma Sánchez waited patiently in line at the foot of a bridge leading across the Rio Grande and into Texas, one of tens of thousands of people stuck on Mexico’s northern border seeking political asylum in the United States.

“They cut my husband to pieces and dumped his body by the road,” Sánchez said matter-of-factly as she showed a visitor a link to a news article about the grisly demise of her spouse, a former taxi driver who, his widow said, refused to pay protection money to the local mob.

“Now I’m afraid they are coming after me and my kids,” she added, explaining why she had fled to Matamoros with her four daughters.

It is the kind of haunting account heard frequently in this Mexican border town, where hundreds of Central American asylum seekers who say they are fleeing gang violence await court dates in the United States. They mostly spend their days in a rough tent city along the Rio Grande, relying largely on charity from donors from the United States and Mexico for food, medical care and other essentials.

Emma Sánchez says she fled her native Acapulco after her husband, a former taxi driver, refused to pay protection money and was killed by a gang that dumped his dismembered body on a roadside. She stands near the Gateway International Bridge from Matamoros, Mexico, to Brownsville, Texas.

But Sánchez is not from Central America. She is a native of Acapulco — once a beach destination for Hollywood movie stars and other high-rolling vacationers, now a sun-splashed Pacific Coast battleground where rival Mexican factions battle for control of drug trafficking and other illicit enterprises.

She is also illustrative of a relatively new — and, from the Trump administration perspective, troubling — trend: The convergence along the border of escalating numbers of Mexican nationals seeking asylum in the United States.

Word about Central Americans and others gaining U.S. footholds via the asylum process has spread to violence-racked areas of Mexico, prompting many to head north to border towns, from Matamoros on the Gulf of Mexico to Tijuana on the Pacific.

“First we heard about the caravans, then we heard that the Central Americans were getting asylum in the United States,” said José Antonio Mendoza, 28, another asylum hopeful here from Guerrero, the western Mexican state where Acapulco is also situated. “And then we heard that asylum was also a possibility for Mexicans.” Mendoza has been waiting here for two months with his wife and two children, ages 3 and 7.

So far, asylum is more of an illusion than a reality for many Mexicans.

The number of Mexican asylum seekers arriving at the southwestern border has been steadily rising in recent months — even as the ranks of Central Americans and others seeking U.S. refuge have slowed in the face of crackdowns and policy shifts in both Mexico and the United States.

Mexican nationals now account for slightly more than half of the 21,000 or so people on various asylum waiting lists in Mexican border towns, according to a study last month by researchers at the University of Texas and UC San Diego. A year ago, relatively few Mexican nationals were in the bulging border asylum queues.

“People hear through friends, through social media, through the news that Mexicans can come to the border and get asylum in the United States,” noted Gladys Cañas, who heads a nonprofit group aiding migrants here. “Some sell their homes or land to finance the trip, but they end up getting stuck here. So far, asylum is more of an illusion than a reality for many Mexicans.”

Here, as at other crossings along the Rio Grande, blue-uniformed officers from U.S. Customs and Border Protection are stationed mid-bridge and stop many asylum seekers from proceeding into U.S. territory. U.S. officials defend the process as necessary because of staff shortages. But immigrant advocates call the practice illegal, possibly sending Mexicans back to their deaths, and have sued to stop it.

For U.S. officials, the Mexican influx poses a special challenge: Unlike Central Americans and other Spanish-speaking asylum aspirants, Mexicans cannot be dispatched back to Mexico to await future court hearings, the fate of more than 50,000 asylum applicants under the Trump administration’s “Remain in Mexico” policy. International law has long banned sending people back to countries where they may face persecution.

Instead, according to Mexican asylum seekers and advocates, U.S. authorities have adopted a policy of allowing only a trickle of Mexican asylum seekers to enter the United States, a process known as “metering.” On some days, migrants say, none of the scores of Mexican asylum seekers who line up here daily at a pair of border bridges are allowed pass into U.S. territory.

And that policy could soon become more restrictive: Last week, Ken Cuccinelli, acting deputy secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, said that Mexican nationals seeking asylum in the United States might be shipped to Guatemala rather than being allowed to wait in the United States for the conclusion of asylum cases, which can drag on for months or years.

The Mexican asylum seekers say they are fleeing their homeland’s endemic gang violence as well as deeply entrenched poverty. Some have previously resided in the United States and have close relatives there, or have U.S.-born children reared in Mexico.

Apart from Guerrero state — where traffickers vie for turf and campesinos till fields of opium poppies — many Mexican asylum seekers come from the southern state of Chiapas, a place not known for rampant cartel violence. However, Chiapas is a region where bloody disputes intertwined with land, politics and religion have long plagued certain rural, largely indigenous zones.

“We as Christians suffer from discrimination, we are seen as second-class citizens,” said Esteban Pérez, 28, who is one of many evangelical asylum seekers from San Juan Chamula, a Chiapas municipality where clashes between evangelicals and Roman Catholics have costs scores of lives and left thousands displaced in recent decades.

Pérez, a member of Chiapas’ Tzotzil-speaking indigenous group, was talking in front of a tent that he shares with a younger brother in the sprawling encampment housing more than 1,000 asylum seekers along the banks of the Rio Grande. Most inhabitants are Central Americans awaiting U.S. court dates under the Remain in Mexico policy, which saw them expelled back to Mexico pending U.S. court appointments in tent courts on the north side of the river.

The camp — where the smell of burning wood on open cooking fires wafts through the air and women wash clothes in the contaminated waters of the Rio Grande — has become the signature site of frustrated asylum seekers stuck along the border.

Many of the Central Americans stranded have been on the road for almost a year, and have already had several U.S. court appearances. Some view the Mexicans, relative newcomers, as line-jumpers — even though the Mexicans face a different initial process than the Central Americans, since they cannot be sent back to Mexico.

“I don’t see why the Mexicans should just be able to walk up and ask for asylum,” said José Orlando López, 29, a Honduran national who said he, his wife and his daughter had already had two U.S. asylum hearings and were waiting for a third scheduled for Jan. 10. “The whole system seems designed to make us lose hope. If the Americans don’t want us, they should just tell us.”

As he spoke, his daughter, Elisabeth, 4, sat on the dirt perusing donated school books with other migrant children, under the guidance of a volunteer teacher.

The migrant camp is next to the entrance to the Gateway International Bridge, which leads to downtown Brownsville, Texas. Along the pedestrian footpath leading to the bridge, Miguel Díaz Sánchez, no relation to Emma Sánchez, kept an eye out for newcomers on a recent morning as he clutched his precious possession — la libreta, or the notebook.

“This is where we keep the names,” said Sánchez, 44, a native of Chiapas and a former worker in a chicken-processing plant in Chattanooga, Tenn. “This way we know who is coming, and we can keep order.”

Miguel Díaz Sánchez, sons Kevin Díaz Lopez, 13, and Brian, 10, and wife Elaine Lopez Vazquez, near the Gateway International Bridge, where Miguel registers Mexican asylum seekers in la libreta, or the notebook. 

Sánchez is, for now, the keeper of the book where the names of Mexican asylum seekers are written down and given a number.

The self-generated lists of Mexican asylum seekers are kept both here and, a few blocks away, at the Brownsville & Matamoros International Bridge. The two lists together recently contained some 150 names, likely representing more than 500 people, since many asylum hopefuls arrive with spouses and children.

Each day, those at the top of the lists are dispatched to the two bridges’ midpoints, where U.S. immigration officers are stationed, to request asylum interviews. List leaders take daily turns going back and forth to the middle of the bridge in a vigil that is mostly lost time.

“I don’t want my daughters to be kidnapped by the cartels and be used by them,” said Marco Antonio Valentín, 30, a native of Mexico’s Guerrero state who was on the bridge with his wife and two daughters, ages 12 and 6, who were huddled together against an early morning chill and a breeze off the river. “I want them to have a chance at the better life.”

Back at the bridge entrance, Miguel Sánchez said that the Mexican asylum seekers retained hope, even though U.S. immigration officers were letting very few get through for asylum interviews. One day earlier this month, however, U.S. officers unexpectedly called for 50 to proceed, stunning the waiting Mexicans.

“I don’t want my daughters to be kidnapped by the cartels and be used by them,” says Marco Antonio Valentín, who was on the bridge with his wife and two daughters, ages 12 and 6. “I want them to have a chance at the better life.”

“That could happen again, we need to be patient,” said Sánchez, who said he hoped to go back to Tennessee, where his mother and four sisters still live, and where his eldest son was born 14 years ago. “For us, that would be our biggest Christmas present: To be back with our families, who are waiting for us with open arms on the other side.”
I urge every White Man, Woman, and Child to do your part and save our beautiful White Race. Stand up and fight in the Racial Holy War, become a Creator today.

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